Valérie Péché, L’objet archéologique : aquarelles de Charles Cournault (1815-1904), Conservation départementale des Musées de la Meuse, Conseil général de la MeValérie Péché, L’objet archéologique : aquarelles de Charles Cournault (1815-1904), Conservation départementale des Musées de la Meuse, Conseil général de la Meuse, 1999, 6 €.

This book was published to coincide with the exhibition organised by the Meuse Museums Conservation department.

In 1987, Madame Simon-Cournault donated a large watercolour collection by Charles Cournault (1815-1904) to the Meuse department. Cournault was a prominent figure in regional archaeology, who presided for a time over the future of the Lorraine History Museum in Nancy. Containing around 2,000 paintings, this collection is essentially made up of objects from excavation sites in Lorraine, dug up during the 19th century and exhibited in major French and international museums. The significance of these watercolour objects – fragments of words, torques, statuettes, and bas-reliefs – largely exceeds the scope of basic archaeological design. We find ourselves in the presence of genuine works of art comparable to the “still lifes” of painters. A student of Eugène Delacroix, Charles Cournault skilfully used bronze, gold and iron weathered by the passing centuries.